Nikolai Khokhlov was a Soviet war hero and agent selected for a dangerous mission: kill a Russian dissident in Frankfurt, West Germany. Khokhlov went to Frankfurt as ordered, but his actions there shocked his superiors in Moscow, and opened a new chapter in the Cold War.

The question I am asked most frequently is what books I recommend for further reading on the topics I write about. There are a trove of fascinating true tales of espionage out there, and I want to share with you seven more books that are sure to hold your interest and take you down new paths.

A James Bond film wouldn’t be complete without a flashy sports car loaded with hidden weapons and gadgets. Although the real world of spycraft features very few high-speed car chases, there’s no question that espionage occasionally requires unique forms of transportation.

Arguably the most famous Russian assassination-by-poisoning occurred on November 1st 2006, when Alexander Litvinenko, a former member of the Russian Federal Security Service (FSB) suddenly fell ill after a meeting in London with some of his old comrades.

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On September 7th, 1978, Georgi Markov was walking along a crowded sidewalk on the Waterloo Bridge over the River Thames. Suddenly feeling a sharp pain in his right thigh, he turned to see a man picking up an umbrella off the sidewalk. A taxi pulled up beside the stranger, who entered it and immediately departed the area.